[Book Cover]

Presenting for Geeks - The Ebook

In their presentations, techies and geeks usually focus on the facts. Which results in presentations that are accurate, cover every aspect of the topic - and tend to overwhelm the audience. As a result, the audience will remember little, if anything, of the actual content.

Presenting for Geeks shows a different approach to presenting by putting the audience at the centre of everything. Seeing things from the audience's perspective leads to a more visual and engaging presentation style that helps them better understand and remember the content of the presentation. Read more about the book.

"If you or someone on your team wants/needs good presentation advice from a fellow technical presenter, then this is the book." -- Garr Reynolds, Author of Presentation Zen

Presenting for Geeks is available from the Amazon Kindle Store, from Google Play or via Ganxy (without DRM). The German translation, Präsentieren für Geeks, is available from Leanpub, from the Amazon Kindle Store, from the Apple iBooks Store, from Google Play, as well as via Ganxy.

Latest Blog Posts

    

Attention Span - Humans vs. The Goldfish

You've probably heard someone being characterised as having "the attention span of a goldfish", meaning that he or she can only focus on something for a very short time. If you search for the actual attention span of a goldfish, you'll even come across a recent study that found that the average human attention span is now less than that of a goldfish (human: 8.25 seconds, goldfish: 9 seconds).

So what does that mean for presentations?

    

Getting rid of Bullet Points - A Clarification

When I'm arguing against the use of bullet points on slides, I often use a little bit of exaggeration to drive home my point. I also spend a lot of time explaining the benefits of visuals and how and why they work.

This sometimes leaves people with the impression that I want them to replace all of their slides with photos. Which, understandably, makes the more technically-minded members of my audience uncomfortable. So maybe I should point out two things:

    

Can I have some water, please?

In Stupid Things Presenters do I described the irritating habit of some speakers to pick up a glass or bottle of water but never drinking from it, which can be very distracting for the audience. Most of the time, however, when speakers do reach out for water it's because they need it and intend to drink from it. Assuming, of course, there is water available for them in the first place.

    

On Breaking The Rules

The last of a series of mostly mediocre talks at a recent event was about breaking the rules. So the speaker decided to drive home his point and broke some of the rules for presenting. Did it help?