[Book Cover]

Presenting for Geeks - The Ebook

In their presentations, techies and geeks usually focus on the facts. Which results in presentations that are accurate, cover every aspect of the topic - and tend to overwhelm the audience. As a result, the audience will remember little, if anything, of the actual content.

Presenting for Geeks shows a different approach to presenting by putting the audience at the centre of everything. Seeing things from the audience's perspective leads to a more visual and engaging presentation style that helps them better understand and remember the content of the presentation. Read more about the book.

"If you or someone on your team wants/needs good presentation advice from a fellow technical presenter, then this is the book." -- Garr Reynolds, Author of Presentation Zen

Presenting for Geeks is available from the Amazon Kindle Store, from the Apple iBooks Store, from Google Play or via Ganxy (without DRM). The German translation, Präsentieren für Geeks, is available from Leanpub and from the Amazon Kindle Store.

Latest Blog Posts

    

Alternatives to Post-its

For me, Post-it notes are an important part of the preparation phase of a presentation. They're great for brainstorming and can serve as early versions of slides. Right now, I am working on a presentation that I'm about to give soon and all I have at this point is a collection of Post-it notes stuck to my whiteboard. But that's all I need to practise this talk!

Once I'm happy with the content and comfortable with the flow, I'm going to sit down at my computer and create the slides. There will probably be fewer slides than the number of Post-its I have right now; some Post-its are early versions of slides, others are simply notes.

But do you always have to use Post-its? Are there any alternative products you could use? I've mentioned software solutions before - mind mapping tools and the free Post-it app. But this is about "analogue" alternatives: Tangible things you can write on with a pen. What alternatives are there?

    

Avoiding the Lectern

At a recent event with three speakers, it was good to see how all three of them tried to avoid standing behind the lectern so that they could better connect with their audience. Trying to do so provided them with new challenges, though.

    

Don't blame the tools, teach people how to use them

According to an article that was shared a lot recently, yet another CEO decided to ban the use of PowerPoint in his company. He's not the first CEO to have that idea and he won't be the last. But, as in all the other cases, what he does is only fighting symptoms, not causes. In other words: He's blaming the tool for being used incorrectly.

    

Maybe the Future (of Presentations) isn't so bright

I recently attended an event, an evening consisting of a series of short talks. Afterwards, it occurred to me that what I've seen could have been representative of the future of presentations, i.e. the /average/ talk we're going to see in the future. And I have to say, the outlook isn't pretty.

On paper, the programme read a bit like a TEDx event: 12 short talks on a range of topics like innovation, management, motivation, health, etc. Content-wise, what we did get, however, were effectively 11 variations of a "you can do it!" talk plus one mildly entertaining one about sex.